July 2007

Regain Lost Time In Your Day

By | 2007-07-02T12:35:29+00:00 2 July 2007|Categories: SandBlog|Tags: |

July CalendarMeetings, Meetings, Meetings…

How often do you review your planner to see your week riddled with meetings and wonder when you’re going to get your own work done?

What’s worse… So many end up a poor use of time and adjourn without accomplishing more than taking an hour out of your busy schedule.

Just because meetings are necessary, doesn’t mean they necessarily have to be bad.

In the June installment of “Sand for Your Inbox” we share secrets to preventing hours lost to non-productive, inefficient meetings. Click and read the complete, engaging, and helpful article.

If you would like our monthly tips and techniques for creativity and problem solving sent to your inbox (absolutely free) sign up by clicking here!

May 2007

Inbox Sand – May ’07 – “A Mazing Strategy”

By | 2007-05-30T17:24:39+00:00 30 May 2007|Categories: SandBlog|Tags: |

Whoosh… It’s nearly the end of May… I’m cutting it close sifting out the May scoop of “Sand for Your Inbox” the Idea Sandbox eNewsletter.

You will enjoy this month’s installment… I offer a “cart before the horse” approach to project and task management.

View it here -> May ’07 Sand for Your Inbox: “A Mazing Strategy”

Why not receive Sand for Your Inbox… in your inbox? Click to join now (for free) and and receive tips and techniques via email.

Enjoy!

Paul

p.s. Let me know what you think in the comments/reactions. thanks!

April 2007

Inbox Sand – April ’07 – “Guaranteed Great” Reading List

By | 2007-04-20T09:23:37+00:00 20 April 2007|Categories: SandBlog|Tags: |

Whelp, another month has flown by and it’s time for the April installment of the “Sand for Your Inbox” eNewsletter. Idea Sandbox Members* have already been alerted of the posting of the newsletter.

This month the folks at the Idea Sandbox Institute share their “Guaranteed Great” Reading List. Click to view our recommendations for the best-of-the-best creativity, problem solving, and ‘get motivated’ books we know.

If you have a recommendation that is not listed… please let us know! (Please, add it to the reactions/comments of this post).

*Each month, you too can get creative inspiration delivered directly to your inbox. Click to become an Idea Sandbox member!

Enjoy!

January 2007

New Year’s Resolution That’ll Stick – Inbox Sand, Jan. ’07

By | 2010-05-24T13:45:45+00:00 12 January 2007|Categories: SandBlog|Tags: , , , |

Happy New Year!

Looking for a New Year’s Resolution you may be able to sustain for the year… or for at least a few months?

upward graphThis month I offer a practical and stick-to-able New Year’s Resolution that you just may adopt as a life philosophy.

Read this year’s first installment of Sand for Your Inbox titled “Comp Yourself.”

If you’d like to receive monthly Sand for Your Inbox directly to your inbox, join the exclusive Idea Sandbox mailing list by -> clicking here.

Thanks for your comments and discussion this past year… Here is to another year of great ideas and problem solving techniques.

I hope you’ve got a good start on a happy and healthy new year!

p.s. Author/blogger John Moore, documents how we practiced this philosophy at Starbucks in a chapter of his book “Tribal Knowledge:.” In fact, he and I must be on the same wavelength… John recently provided the entire chapter Always Measure Your Comparable Job Performance on his blog for free.

April 2006

New Ideas: Pause Before You Pounce

By | 2017-08-20T17:46:17+00:00 23 April 2006|Categories: Sand for Your Inbox|Tags: , , , |

New ideas can lead to innovations. Often the speed in which we conduct business causes us to make rapid decisions. As a result, we may be robbing ourselves of good ideas.

New ideas can be fragile things. We’ve all experienced it… In a meeting, you muster up the courage to offer a new or unique thought that you feel will make a difference. The idea immediately gets quashed by a cynic or someone playing “devil’s advocate.”

“We tried that before…”

“That’ll never work.”

“Good luck!”

As quickly as it was described, the idea is killed. A way to prevent the premature ruin of ideas, consider pausing before you pounce.

Matt Kingdon, in his book “Sticky Wisdom: How To Start a Creative Revolution at Work” calls this pause “greenhousing.” This behavior “protects young ideas when they are at their most vulnerable, and nurtures them into healthy growth.” Greenhousing requires three key steps…

  1. Suspend – It doesn’t matter if it’s a good idea or not, don’t evaluate it at first. Hold your judgement. Be positive.
  2. Understand – Put yourself in the shoes of the person suggesting the idea. Listen. Ask questions if you don’t understand. (Supporting questions not barbed questions).
  3. Nurture – Add or build on the idea. Brainstorm more on how to make the idea even stronger. Add value.

(A way to remember these is that they form the acronym S.U.N.)

Next time you find yourself about to pounce… consider replacing the negative comments with positive comments. For example…

Negative
Positive
“That won’t work…”
“That’s impossible…”
“It’s not good enough…”
“We don’t have time for this…”
“Yes, but…”
“What could work?
“What is possible?”
“Forget perfection.”
“What could we stop to make time?”
“A build on that idea would be…”

By replacing judgement with building you allow an idea to grow into something better or even transform into something completely different.

Admittedly, this change in behavior requires practice. But if you integrate this into your daily interactions, you’ll be pleasantly surprised to discover the ideas you’ve been missing.

Related and Suggested Reading:

I give each of these books my highest recommendation. In fact, I’m so confident… if you buy any of them and don’t like them… I’ll repay the cost of the book!

Change the Way You See Everything: Through Asset Based Thinking
by Kathryn Cramer and Hank Wasiak

Kathy and Hank outline the philosophy of approaching people, places and things from an “have” vs. a “have not” perspective. I’ve purchased 15 copies of this book just to give to folks who I think could use the knowledge!

Sticky Wisdom: How to Start a Creative Revolution at Work
by Matt Kingdon

I could NOT put this book down. It helped inspire the topic of this newsletter. Matt outlines six key behaviors (including greenhousing) that make creativity “accessible to everyone.”

The Ten Faces of Innovation
by Tom Kelley

Tom describes ten roles (faces) people may possess and outlines the value each role contributes to the innovation process.

Have more, better ideas by nurturing them and avoiding hasty judgments.

March 2006

RE: Sand for Your Inbox

By | 2017-08-20T16:20:22+00:00 8 March 2006|Categories: SandBlog|Tags: |

Each month I send out an e-mail with creative tips called Sand for Your Inbox…

Customer feedback, both positive and negative, is one of the most important assets a company has – it’s gold.

I’ve received some very warm feedback and I’m proud to share it with you…

“I really like this perspective…Good stuff… keep it coming” – Andrew

“This is great stuff! I love the drive-thru example.” – Lynn

“I like that creativity tip…the Starbucks one is good.” – Rob

“This is awesome!! Thank you. It did provide great thought starters!” – Erika

“Great sand!” – Scott

“Thank you for the great ideas.” – Anne

“I LOVE – Sand for Your Inbox. I have found the ideas; tips and recommended readings a great source of inspiration and mind expanding. The emails always surprise and delight – so a real joy to receive – and come at the right time!” – Katherine

“This is really good…this is such a great way to think about it… I’m going to have to check in later on the Imaginary Board of Directors, but my immediate response to the concept is that it’s brilliant. – Lara

“This was great, Paul. Thanks for the ideas.” – Brad

“Thanks for sending me your idea.” – Guy

“Thanks Paul, for keeping the creative juices flowing!” – Mistilyn

“Nice – I like the reminder that we want and need to be Creative! That’s what makes it fun!” – Kathleen

For those of you who want to join the list, click this link. If you would, please provide your first name so I may personalize the e-mail.